view of rows of plants under shade cloth

BNP nursery

Blackfoot Native Plants (BNP) Nursery
Over 150 species of native plants from Western Montana including hardy native grasses, shrubs and wildflowers.  We hand collect seed to ensure genetic diversity and grow totally out-of-doors so you’ll have the hardiest plants available.

Hours:  Our season opens May 1, 2014.
Feel free to contact us via email or phone.

Location:  33397 Camas Trail, Potomac, Montana (we suggest calling or emailing for directions!)

Market: See you at the Clark Fork River Market beginning May 3, 2014!

Click here for our species list and current availability.
We’ve changed our species list.  We will no longer be growing some species, but if you are looking for something you don’t see on the availability list, be sure to call – we just might have some left!

Interested in having us contract grow plants for your project?  Click here for more information.

clusters of yellow rays flowers of Oregon Sunshine

Oregon Sunshine

How We Raise Our Native Plants

Our plants are grown from hand-collected seeds or propagated from cuttings of local plants.  We do not dig plants from the wild.

nursery sign "Blackfoot Native Plants Nursery" and garden with yellow flowers beneath

Nursery entrance

Unlike nurseries that use genetically altered cultivars of native plants, we propagate wild native seeds we collect and take cuttings from local sources.  It is our belief that locally sourced plants are hardier and are more beneficial to their natural ecosystems than those that have been altered to enhance particular characteristics of a species.

Our plants are grown in containers out-of-doors (not in greenhouses) at 4000’ – USDA Zone 4b (USDA Plant hardiness zone map) to ensure extreme hardiness.  Most have already spent at least one winter in a pot.  Our plants thrive at high altitudes with short growing seasons where drought, cool nights, and extreme winter temperatures are common.

My husband says that our motto should be “If it grows at our house, it will darn well grow at yours!”  Well, he changes the ‘d’ word to something a little different.  You get the idea.  It’s a tough place for a plant in a container to grow.

Look forward to hearing from you,
Kathy 

 

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